Notice: register_sidebar was called incorrectly. No id was set in the arguments array for the "1" sidebar. Defaulting to "sidebar-1". Manually set the id to "sidebar-1" to silence this notice and keep existing sidebar content. Please see Debugging in WordPress for more information. (This message was added in version 4.2.0.) in /home6/agrenerg/public_html/biodieselisgood/wp-includes/functions.php on line 4139

Notice: register_sidebar was called incorrectly. No id was set in the arguments array for the "2" sidebar. Defaulting to "sidebar-2". Manually set the id to "sidebar-2" to silence this notice and keep existing sidebar content. Please see Debugging in WordPress for more information. (This message was added in version 4.2.0.) in /home6/agrenerg/public_html/biodieselisgood/wp-includes/functions.php on line 4139

Notice: register_sidebar was called incorrectly. No id was set in the arguments array for the "3" sidebar. Defaulting to "sidebar-3". Manually set the id to "sidebar-3" to silence this notice and keep existing sidebar content. Please see Debugging in WordPress for more information. (This message was added in version 4.2.0.) in /home6/agrenerg/public_html/biodieselisgood/wp-includes/functions.php on line 4139

Notice: register_sidebar was called incorrectly. No id was set in the arguments array for the "4" sidebar. Defaulting to "sidebar-4". Manually set the id to "sidebar-4" to silence this notice and keep existing sidebar content. Please see Debugging in WordPress for more information. (This message was added in version 4.2.0.) in /home6/agrenerg/public_html/biodieselisgood/wp-includes/functions.php on line 4139
Uncategorized » Biodiesel is Good

Archive for the ‘Uncategorized’ category

Notice: Use of undefined constant archives - assumed 'archives' in /home6/agrenerg/public_html/biodieselisgood/wp-content/themes/cordobo-green-park-2/archive.php on line 32

Notice: Use of undefined constant page - assumed 'page' in /home6/agrenerg/public_html/biodieselisgood/wp-content/themes/cordobo-green-park-2/archive.php on line 32
class="post-263 post type-post status-publish format-standard hentry category-uncategorized">

No Time Like November, 2013

November 6th, 2013

Notice: Use of undefined constant archives - assumed 'archives' in /home6/agrenerg/public_html/biodieselisgood/wp-content/themes/cordobo-green-park-2/archive.php on line 32

Notice: Use of undefined constant page - assumed 'page' in /home6/agrenerg/public_html/biodieselisgood/wp-content/themes/cordobo-green-park-2/archive.php on line 32
class="post-193 post type-post status-publish format-standard hentry category-uncategorized">

Matriculating this Fall at a Campus Near You: Biodiesel!

July 21st, 2011

I have recently been talking to a lot of college, university and even high school administrators, and I am optimistic the upcoming school year will see a surge in small-scale biodiesel production at the campus level. There are plenty of good reasons for this increased focus on biodiesel. Allow me to enumerate just a few of these, after which I am happy to share with you – in a one-on-one (or communal) head thumping Eureka moment – the logic, the elegance and the timeliness of Campus Biodiesel and how these factors combine in a veritable fire of logical potentiality. (No stranger to the ivory tower experience, I have taken the liberty of utilizing an oft relied upon study aid: Cliff Note: It really does make so much sense).

1. Over 700 colleges and universities have signed the American College and University Presidents’ Climate Commitment (http://www.presidentsclimatecommitment.org/). This is an impressive initiative which is helping to accelerate progress towards climate neutrality and sustainability. The signatories of this document have committed to actively work towards achieving a carbon neutral footprint as soon as possible. Importantly, using biodiesel is a huge accelerator for these colleges and universities, as every gallon of biodiesel used in place of diesel reduces your CO2 emission by up to 90% (California Air Resource Board – GREET Pathway for used cooking oil as feedstock for biodiesel production:http://www.arb.ca.gov/fuels/lcfs/092309lcfs_uco_bd.pdf) and reduces particulate matter emissions – the stuff that is considered highly carcinogenic (source: http://www.cancer.org/Cancer/CancerCauses/OtherCarcinogens/Pollution/die…) by almost 50% (EPA).

Cliff Note # 1 = “Biodiesel is good and heathy.”

2. In an era of slashed budgets and high energy prices, small-scale biodiesel represents a funding source for schools. They are able to turn their used cooking oil – which they often pay to have removed from campus – into ASTM-grade biodiesel for less than $1.00/gallon (assuming you operate one of Springboard Biodiesel’s BioPro™ biodiesel processors). In California, as of June 30th, that means they save over $3.00 per gallon of biodiesel produced. The more you make; the more you save; the faster the payback on the machine.

Cliff Note #2 = “Biodiesel saves you money.”

3. Many academic institutions are implementing Sustainability Curriculums, and their small-scale biodiesel processor can be incorporated into any class on biofuels.

Cliff Note #3 = “What a great teaching tool!”

4. Most school campuses employ diesel powered vehicles and/or equipment that can run on biodiesel (see #2 above).

Cliff Note #4 = “Saves Money, again.”

5. College students are increasingly active in asking their organizations to take concrete steps to address the climate change issue, and biodiesel is a viable and valuable first step.

Cliff Note #5 = “Our customers demand it.”

Institutions of higher learning are built to innovate. On the environmental front, colleges, universities and K-12 institutions are actively working to make a difference, and as a result biodiesel is becoming mainstream. Give us a call and let’s talk about how you can join over 56 of your colleagues (http://www.springboardbiodiesel.com/biodiesel-for-colleges-and-universities) in the growing movement to benefit from small-scale biodiesel production.

Cliff note Summary: “Call Springboard Biodiesel to learn how to become a campus hero.”

Mark Roberts

 

Notice: Use of undefined constant archives - assumed 'archives' in /home6/agrenerg/public_html/biodieselisgood/wp-content/themes/cordobo-green-park-2/archive.php on line 32

Notice: Use of undefined constant page - assumed 'page' in /home6/agrenerg/public_html/biodieselisgood/wp-content/themes/cordobo-green-park-2/archive.php on line 32
class="post-171 post type-post status-publish format-standard hentry category-uncategorized">

Old Biodiesel, Sediment, and Ultra Low Sulfur Diesel (ULSD)

March 16th, 2011
Daniel Bowen Head Chemist

Daniel Bowen Senior Chemical Engineer at Springboard Biodiesel

As you all likely know, biodiesel is a wonderfully biodegradable substance that typically breaks down quickly in the environment.  While this is a good thing, it has its downsides too.  Most notably, the fact that biodiesel is much more susceptible than petroleum diesel to microbial attack and oxidation.  As biodiesel decomposes, it forms acidic compounds (giving it a rancid smell) as well as many small polymer chains and large chemical compounds that are typically somewhat polar.  (The polarity of molecules is one of the largest factors that determine if they will dissolve in a particular solvent or not.  Polarity in a molecule is caused by uneven electrical charge distribution.  One can think of polar molecules as being somewhat like little magnets wanting to stick together and non-polar molecule as being like little pieces of gravel that don’t have a strong affinity for one another.) If this course goes too far, sediment (composed of these polymers and large molecules) will begin to form.

A logical supposition to make when there is some biodiesel that seems aged would be to blend it with petroleum diesel to dilute it and then burn it that way.  Unfortunately though, this is actually a very bad thing.  Due to the fact that biodiesel is slightly polar, it is able dissolve many of the large molecules which are slightly polar as well.  In solution, these molecules are typically able to be successfully burned in a diesel engine.

Upon mixing with USLD though, something terrible happens.  Because ULSD is very non-polar, (even much more so than typical LSD) the compounds that used to be dissolved in biodiesel fall out of solution.  In some cases , this can form a large amount of precipitants and sediment.  If you do this in your fuel tank, you are likely to almost immediately get some clogging in your fuel filters.

If you want to see this same type of phenomenon occur in a test tube, dissolve 1 part veg oil in 10 parts isopropyl alcohol.  The nonpolar oil is able to dissolve somewhat in the medium-polarity isopropyl.  Now add 2 parts water to the solution.  All of the sudden, the oil falls out of the solution because the highly polar water kicks it out.   It is a classic demonstration of how a change in polarity of the solvent can cause solutes to precipitate out of it.

So how can you keep this from happening in your fuel tank.  One strategy would be to mix the old biodiesel with ULSD in a separate vessel, and then filter or settle out the sediment.  Another would be to try to treat the biodiesel in question with magnesol.  We have seen good results in using this product to remove polar contaminants and allowing the fuel to be burned without problems.

The best thing of course, is to prevent the fuel from oxidizing to begin with.  Blending it with petroleum diesel or adding a little bit of stabilizer (http://www.springboardbiodiesel.com/springboard-biodiesel-oxidative-stabilizer) can mitigate this potential problem.

In conclusion, any fuel ; petroleum based or not will eventually degrade.  Because it is biodegradable, biodiesel will typically be prone to this degradation even more so than petroleum based fuels.  With a few simple precautions however (more on this in future posts) problems that could be associated with this can be easily avoided.  And even if fuel is somewhat oxidized it can be effectively salvaged.